£50k

 

Last weekend was Relay for Life weekend. I was involved as a survivor, team captain and as a member of the committee. The fundraising before the event and on the day has raised £50k for Cancer Research UK with more still coming in. It was a knackering, wet, weekend but was amazing to see so many people getting behind the cause and the event. A huge well done to Lou who was brave enough to take on the huge challenge of bringing the event from an idea to fruition. It’s a privilege to be able to see where this money will get spent as I get more involved in the consumer forum with NCRI.

 

 

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Jeremy and Alistair

On Tuesday I saw Alistair Campbell at Waterloo station. Today I was on the same site as Jeremy Hunt.

I’ve always quite fancied Alastair Campbell. He writes a cracking novel. I admire his honesty around his alcoholism and battles with mental health. I’m ashamed to say I stared, walked away, turned back and stared again. If he hadn’t been on the phone I’d probably have gone up and said hello.

I know there is something I could say about Jeremy HUNT that fits with the topic of vaginas but I just can’t find the right word……..

Anyhow. I usually spend my time in my rural bubble of bliss and venturing out into the big city is always good. This week I was at the Angel Building, Cancer Research HQ.

A few weeks ago Jane my Macmillan nurse had emailed me the details of a position within the NCRI National Cancer Research Institute. Saying no pressure but I think you’d be good at this. The role was for a consumer member of a clinical studies group for gynaecological cancers. Long story short, I was interviewed, I babbled a lot, told the interviewers my two best attributes were being gobby and feisty and got the role!! More details of this will no doubt follow.

Today I was at Dorchester hospital. I was speaking to a group of 17 year olds who wanted to become doctors. I was a little jealous! They had a 3 day programme of fascinating talks and visits to different specialities in primary and secondary care. My job was to tell them about my patient journey. They were a great group but it saddened me to hear how they were put off following their dream due to cost of tuition fees and tales of workloads from junior doctors.

Just metres away from me Jeremy was having a private visit to the hospital. No general public nor press were allowed. I can’t imagine he ever waits for a train at Waterloo station.